Introduction to Homoeopathic Medicine

Taal
English
Type
Paperback
Uitgever
Beaconsfield
Author(s) Hamish Boyd
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In what important ways is homoeopathy different from conventional medicine? What is meant by 'the homoeopathic approach'? What is the homoeopath's concept of chronic disease? How does homoeopathic case- taking differ from conventional case-taking? Which are the remedies you need to know in detail, and how do you prescribe them?

This book provides a systematic introduction to the principles of homoeopathic medicine. It shows how the homoeopath's selection of a remedy is based on a process that goes beyond the diagnosis of a particular condition to a perception of the patient as a whole and individual person.

The homoeopathic materia medica is discussed in relation to the systems of the body and the patient's presenting complaints, in a framework that will be familiar to any doctor. The author uses this framework to describe the subsequent management of the patient in homoeopathic terms. He describes the clinical conditions in which homoeopathy is particularly useful, and those where conventional treatment is likely to be necessary, as well as the circumstances where orthodox medicine and homoeopathic medicine can fruitfully be used in conjunction with one another.

The symptom pictures of fifty-five of the most important remedies are then described in detail, offering the reader a sufficient basis on which to introduce them into his or her own practice. Dr Margaret Tyler's valuable 'Study of Kent's Repertory' is given as an Appendix.


'The book is clearly laid out and well presented. The material is divided into clearly defined chapters which make it easy to dip into. I felt it succeeds well as an introduction to homoeopathic medicine, presenting the material simply, but at the same time leaving nothing out. I liked particularly the way in which Dr Boyd expressed the importance of utilising the best of homoeopathic medicine and the best of orthodox medicine. He got the balance just right.'

The Homoeopath
Meer informatie
ISBN9780906584217
AuteurHamish Boyd
TypePaperback
TaalEnglish
Publicatiedatum1989-10-31
Pagina's285
UitgeverBeaconsfield
Recensie

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the National Center for Homeopathy

Reviewed by Francis Treuherz, RSHom

I have dozens of introductory textbooks on homeopathy on my groaning shelves. This book is a textbook but certainly one which shows erudition, experience, and wisdom where there is no compromise with allopathy for the sake of the neophyte.

There is no place at present for teaching about homeopathy in the normal medical school syllabus, and the interest shown by medical students reported in recent surveys is based on ignorance. Too often, attempts are made to modify the ideas of homeopathy in an attempt to make it acceptable to allopaths. Research is carried out which suggests that there may be an action of, say, Rhus toxicodendron 6c as a named specific remedy and potency for arthritis, as if this may soften the prejudice of the old school; I believe this only serves to confuse as there are only remedies for patients.

The strength of the present book is that the style of language and presentation is such that allopaths will understand, but the principles are entirely those which we recognize as those of Hahnemann and Kent. Two things are necessary for the successful selection of a similar remedy: a clear picture of the patient's symptoms and a comprehensive knowledge of the materia medica. These principles are laid out in categories which the conventionally trained physician or medical student will comprehend, with further references and reading lists for the classic homeopathic literature.

I imagine that since the author is the Dean of the Faculty of Homeopathy, his book is a standard work for the Faculty candidate. I can only praise it and assume that those who come to scoff will also remain to praise.

There are carefully structured opening chapters outlining what homeopathy can offer compared to conventional treatment, and the reader is referred forward to the more detailed chapters which follow. There are succinct chapters on the unique features of homeopathic case taking and diagnosis; the preparation, prescribing, and administration of the remedy; and an over-view of research. The systematic approach to materia medica begins with just that, suggested ways of approaching different body systems and their disease patterns. So often, this can be an area of pitfalls, but Boyd retains the whole person approach and refers to constitutional treatment all the time. There follows a brief materia medica of 55 remedies. It bears an acknowledged debt to Gibson's Studies of Homeopathic Remedies (Beaconsfield 1986), and it is hoped that readers will have their appetites whetted for the real thing. There are references to homeopathic gurus from other countries, Dorcsi, Eizayaga, Koehler, Vithoulkas, as well as references to the classics like Clarke. There is a welcome reprint of Margaret Tyler's inimitable Study of Kent's Repertory. The book is indexed with remedies and subjects also.

Gone is the somewhat humble and apologetic air of the first edition of this book; homeopathy can stand on its own feet not as an alternative but the alternative medicine as Margery Blackie had it. It is a book to be recommended to all other alternative practitioners.

Francis Treuherz, RSHom, is a Director of the Society of Homoeopaths, editor of the Homoeopath, and has a practice in London. His other interests in homeopathy include collecting old books, teaching, and computer software.

A slightly different version of this review appeared in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

HOMEOPATHY TODAY MARCH 1991

This book review is reprinted from the British Homoeopathic Journal Volume 79, Number 3, July 1990, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

This book was first published in 1981 and quickly became a classic. It was divided into three parts. The first, entitled Principles and Practice of Homoeopathy, gave in a remarkably short space an explanation of homoeopathy and how it is applied. There were chapters explaining what homoeopathy is, its origins and what it has to offer, together with an explanation of the materia medica. There followed chapters on case taking, potentization and prescribing. The section ended with a chapter on research.

The second part of the book was a systematic approach to the materia medica. It gave lists of medicines for each system of the body on a pathological basis. It was intended for conventionally trained doctors who had not yet learned to appreciate a method of treating patients rather than diseases. This section included summaries of Borland's Childrens Types and the bowel nosodes.

The last section gave drug pictures of fifty of the commonest medicines, all short but covering all the main symptoms. The book ended with questions taken from the diploma examination and intended for prospective candidates.

The format of the new edition is little altered but the text has been completely revised in the light of various criticisms and suggestions made over the years. Five new medicines have been added to the materia medica section: Carcinosin, Cimicifuga, Phosphoric acid, Kali Sulph. and Kali phos. This brings the number of medicines described to fifty-five. It would obviously be impossible to produce a list of the most common medicines that would be agreed by everybody. No doubt fifty-five homoeopathic physicians would produce fifty-five different lists, but Dr Boyd has given a very useful summary of the materia medica. Possibly as important is his decision to include information from the studies of George Vithoulkas to expand the 'mentals' of the polychrests so that there is a much fuller picture. The other major addition is the inclusion of Margaret Tyler's Introduction to Kent's Repertory edited by Dr Boyd into more modern English.

The book is some forty-five pages longer than the first edition and produced on glazed paper instead of the previously used unglazed. Although apparently the same it has a better feel to it, more a 'book' that a 'paper back'. It is remarkable in that it manages to compress so much information into so little space. There seems to be hardly any homoeopathic subject which is not at least touched upon. Entitled an 'Introduction', it serves well as that for the newcomer and would give enough information for a new doctor to start using homoeopathy in his practice. But it is much more advanced and must form the basis of the examination candidate's revision.

Finally the more senior doctor would learn a lot that he may have forgotten. When I came to write this review I realized how well thumbed my copy of the first edition was. I am sure that this new edition will prove equally useful to hundreds of doctors. It should be on every homoeopathic bookshelf.

BERNARD LEARY

British Homoeopathic Journal
Volume 79, Number 3, July 1990

Recensie

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the National Center for Homeopathy

Reviewed by Francis Treuherz, RSHom

I have dozens of introductory textbooks on homeopathy on my groaning shelves. This book is a textbook but certainly one which shows erudition, experience, and wisdom where there is no compromise with allopathy for the sake of the neophyte.

There is no place at present for teaching about homeopathy in the normal medical school syllabus, and the interest shown by medical students reported in recent surveys is based on ignorance. Too often, attempts are made to modify the ideas of homeopathy in an attempt to make it acceptable to allopaths. Research is carried out which suggests that there may be an action of, say, Rhus toxicodendron 6c as a named specific remedy and potency for arthritis, as if this may soften the prejudice of the old school; I believe this only serves to confuse as there are only remedies for patients.

The strength of the present book is that the style of language and presentation is such that allopaths will understand, but the principles are entirely those which we recognize as those of Hahnemann and Kent. Two things are necessary for the successful selection of a similar remedy: a clear picture of the patient's symptoms and a comprehensive knowledge of the materia medica. These principles are laid out in categories which the conventionally trained physician or medical student will comprehend, with further references and reading lists for the classic homeopathic literature.

I imagine that since the author is the Dean of the Faculty of Homeopathy, his book is a standard work for the Faculty candidate. I can only praise it and assume that those who come to scoff will also remain to praise.

There are carefully structured opening chapters outlining what homeopathy can offer compared to conventional treatment, and the reader is referred forward to the more detailed chapters which follow. There are succinct chapters on the unique features of homeopathic case taking and diagnosis; the preparation, prescribing, and administration of the remedy; and an over-view of research. The systematic approach to materia medica begins with just that, suggested ways of approaching different body systems and their disease patterns. So often, this can be an area of pitfalls, but Boyd retains the whole person approach and refers to constitutional treatment all the time. There follows a brief materia medica of 55 remedies. It bears an acknowledged debt to Gibson's Studies of Homeopathic Remedies (Beaconsfield 1986), and it is hoped that readers will have their appetites whetted for the real thing. There are references to homeopathic gurus from other countries, Dorcsi, Eizayaga, Koehler, Vithoulkas, as well as references to the classics like Clarke. There is a welcome reprint of Margaret Tyler's inimitable Study of Kent's Repertory. The book is indexed with remedies and subjects also.

Gone is the somewhat humble and apologetic air of the first edition of this book; homeopathy can stand on its own feet not as an alternative but the alternative medicine as Margery Blackie had it. It is a book to be recommended to all other alternative practitioners.

Francis Treuherz, RSHom, is a Director of the Society of Homoeopaths, editor of the Homoeopath, and has a practice in London. His other interests in homeopathy include collecting old books, teaching, and computer software.

A slightly different version of this review appeared in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

HOMEOPATHY TODAY MARCH 1991

This book review is reprinted from the British Homoeopathic Journal Volume 79, Number 3, July 1990, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

This book was first published in 1981 and quickly became a classic. It was divided into three parts. The first, entitled Principles and Practice of Homoeopathy, gave in a remarkably short space an explanation of homoeopathy and how it is applied. There were chapters explaining what homoeopathy is, its origins and what it has to offer, together with an explanation of the materia medica. There followed chapters on case taking, potentization and prescribing. The section ended with a chapter on research.

The second part of the book was a systematic approach to the materia medica. It gave lists of medicines for each system of the body on a pathological basis. It was intended for conventionally trained doctors who had not yet learned to appreciate a method of treating patients rather than diseases. This section included summaries of Borland's Childrens Types and the bowel nosodes.

The last section gave drug pictures of fifty of the commonest medicines, all short but covering all the main symptoms. The book ended with questions taken from the diploma examination and intended for prospective candidates.

The format of the new edition is little altered but the text has been completely revised in the light of various criticisms and suggestions made over the years. Five new medicines have been added to the materia medica section: Carcinosin, Cimicifuga, Phosphoric acid, Kali Sulph. and Kali phos. This brings the number of medicines described to fifty-five. It would obviously be impossible to produce a list of the most common medicines that would be agreed by everybody. No doubt fifty-five homoeopathic physicians would produce fifty-five different lists, but Dr Boyd has given a very useful summary of the materia medica. Possibly as important is his decision to include information from the studies of George Vithoulkas to expand the 'mentals' of the polychrests so that there is a much fuller picture. The other major addition is the inclusion of Margaret Tyler's Introduction to Kent's Repertory edited by Dr Boyd into more modern English.

The book is some forty-five pages longer than the first edition and produced on glazed paper instead of the previously used unglazed. Although apparently the same it has a better feel to it, more a 'book' that a 'paper back'. It is remarkable in that it manages to compress so much information into so little space. There seems to be hardly any homoeopathic subject which is not at least touched upon. Entitled an 'Introduction', it serves well as that for the newcomer and would give enough information for a new doctor to start using homoeopathy in his practice. But it is much more advanced and must form the basis of the examination candidate's revision.

Finally the more senior doctor would learn a lot that he may have forgotten. When I came to write this review I realized how well thumbed my copy of the first edition was. I am sure that this new edition will prove equally useful to hundreds of doctors. It should be on every homoeopathic bookshelf.

BERNARD LEARY

British Homoeopathic Journal
Volume 79, Number 3, July 1990