Integrity Homeopathy

Taal
English
Type
Paperback
Uitgever
Verlag Peter Irl
Author(s) Sheilagh Creasy
4 Items Op voorraad
€ 34,00

The Integrity of Homoeopathy is a textbook and reference work for both students and practitioners who wish to follow classical principles in their homoeopathic prescribing. It is a continuation of Hahnemann's pure homoeopathy into the modern era, extending the teachings of 'how to adapt according to clearly defined principles' and the 'sphere of activity'. Based on Sheilagh Creasy's extensive experience as a classical Homoeopath spanning over half a century and most of the globe, this book presents philosophy, case histories and miasms in a focused and readable style which can be readily accessed for desktop reference. In particular, Sheilagh Creasy's explanation of the Relationships of Remedies is laid out in clear diagrams, creating an invaluable tool for working out today's cases. Sheilagh Creasy embodies an era of homoeopaths before the current confusion of eclecticism, experimentation, innovation and revolutionary new ideas. Under her guidance, homoeopathy returns to its simple, clear and effective origins and is then applied to today's cases. Her declared ethos is, 'I will be ready to learn from new teachers when I have learned everything the old masters have to offer.' And on this basis, graduates travel from all over the UK to her workshops in London, students and patients alike contact her daily from around the world, for pure and effective homoeopathy. The Integrity of Homoeopathy is this sought after teaching. 'Sheilagh's passion and dedication to nurture the next generation of classical homoeopaths always leaves me feeling energised and inspired.' Workshop student, London.

Meer informatie
ISBN9783933666369
AuteurSheilagh Creasy
TypePaperback
TaalEnglish
Publicatiedatum2007-12-01
Pagina's267
UitgeverVerlag Peter Irl
Recensie

This book review is reprinted from The Homeopath with the permission from Autumn 2007, Volume 26:2 of The Society of Homoeopaths.

Reviewed by Elaine Weatherley- Jones

There are nor enough books in the homeopathic literature that deal clearly and accurately with the concept of miasms and the application of this concept in contemporary clinical practice. So works on this complex subject are very welcome and I looked forward to reviewing this recent contribution to the field from such a celebrated and experienced practitioner and teacher.

The book begins with an introduction to the origins of Hahnemann's concept of miasms in terms of both his clinical experience and the philosophical context. The author presents the ideas in a way that is grounded in her personal reflections of decades of clinical practice and study of homeopathic literature. Some of these reflections were rather surprising and I was not persuaded on the basis of the information that was presented that, for example, Hahnemann may have been a Jew (p2) or that the "original changing state in mankind was...of a moral and spiritual disorder" (p3). The whole section had the judgemental tone of an Old Testament text. I wondered what relevance these ideas had to the theory and practice of miasms. Overall I did not feel I learned much about the basic principles of miasms from this chapter and felt rather disappointed and alienated by the style and content.

The subsequent chapters are a series of descriptions of each of the miasms in turn and finally, a surprisingly short conclusion. Four miasms are covered - psoric, syphilitic, sycotic and tubercular. For each miasm, a list of characteristics is given followed by some illustrative cases. I found these rather confusing - a wealth of information was present in each of the lists of characteristics but there was no means of gathering it together into a meaningful whole. It felt like reading the lists of symptoms in Clarke's Dictionary of Materia Medica. I am aware of the problem of resolving long lists of symptoms into a meaningful understanding of a remedy or a miasm. I feel that there is a need for more analysis and interpretation of symptoms that can be understood by those of us who wish to deepen our understanding of the theory of miasms and its application.

I feel that there is probably vast knowledge in this book, but it is not laid out in a way that is accessible to students and practitioners, like me, with only a relatively superficial knowledge of the miasms. It quite possibly is a valuable reference tool for those with a great deal of clinical practice with the miasms. The knowledge, skills and experience of the author are hidden in the depths of this book, but have not been brought out in' production. That the author has been immersed in the theory and practice of miasms and has a deep understanding of homeopathy is clear. I feel this could have been a completely different book if there had been some sober and sound editorial advice which seems to have been lacking so that the information is presented in an indigestible form. It is as if we are in the kitchen of a Michelin star chef with exquisite ingredients laid out, yet the sublime meal fails to appear because the kitchen assistant is unsuccessful to ensure we have a working oven or hob.

This book review is reprinted from Homeopathy, Volume 97, Number 4, October 2008, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

Reviewed by David Owen, Winchester, UK

This book starts with Sheilagh Creasy presenting her 'beliefs in Hahnemann's concepts of miasms'. Using her many years of clinical experience and of teaching homeopathy she present her experience of using miasmatic approaches in the treatment of chronic disease. Using a series of case reports, in depth studies of miasms (Psora, Syphilis, Sycosis and Tubercular) and their associated remedies. She starts from the premise that miasms (these 4) have been 'maligned and ignored' and her book does a good job of explaining the thrust of the 4 miasms covered and the associated remedies.

Behind this miasmatic and materia medica information there are many useful pointers in the clinical management of chronic disease, although some of them, such as the idea of latent and active miasms could benefit from further explanation. This book would be a useful companion for the more serious student of homeopathy or for any practitioner revisiting the way they work miasmatically, particularly for those who want to broaden the remedies that they think of in associated with different miasms. In practice I suspect this will be a book for those who have experienced Sheilagh Creasy's teaching and want to have a book to refresh them of some of the concepts and teaching she has covered.

Although I enjoyed some of her more personal diversions into different ideas and concepts, it is sometimes difficult to separate out hypotheses from information that is verified. It is perhaps unfortunate that her first chapter, while accurately talking about Hahnemann's Swedenborgian influences, presents her opinion that Hahnemann may have been a Jew as if it were well established.

On the positive side however, there are numerous insights into materia medica that her clinical experience brings, such as the comparison of different calcium and potassium salts, the idea that remedies that fit on one level reveal deeper acting (and often miasmatic) remedies as deeper aspects of the case. The book is a reminder of her wide range of clinical experience including, for example a discussion on the treatment of an AIDS patient who had also suffered Syphilis and the treatment of the early stages of Tuberculosis. This is a reminder to all those who have worked in homeopathy for a long time that they have valuable insights for our profession and we are indebted to all those that take the time to record them.

The book, like many things worthwhile, is not immediately accessible or easy to dip into, but students and practitioners who are prepared to look below the surface and who are not put off by a lack of structure will get a lot from it.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 101, Number 1 Spring 2008 edition, with permission from American Journal of Homeopathic Medicine.

Reviewed by George Guess, MD, DHt

This reviewer is grateful for the many books that have been published recently about miasms, especially since my earlier homeopathic education was deficient in that area. I can now increasingly see the utility of analyzing cases miasmatically and establishing a blueprint for initial and subsequent treatment.

Ms. Creasy's contribution to this body of literature is equally appreciated. Terse is the first adjective that comes to mind as I think of this book; the bulk of the information is provided in somewhat of an outlined form, with few complete sentences. This economy of words contains a wealth of in formation, however, as it details very succinctly the symptomatic characteristics of the psoric, sycotic, syphilitic and tubercular miasms. After each introduction to a miasm, materia medica highlights of many of the principle remedies in each miasm are provided, complete with a miasmatic analysis (called a "miasmatic reading" - example below) of the remedy (i.e., which symptoms of the remedy correspond to which miasm). Illustrative cases follow, demonstrating miasmatic treatment. Remedy relationships are also emphasized.

Here is an example of a Miasmatic Reading of Dulcamara:

Dulcamara Miasmatic Reading
Psoric; Sycotic; Syphilitic; Tubercular _

Sycotic
Rages
Catarrhal discharges. Snuffles. < Cold, damp.
< cold, damp conditions = diarrhea.
Rheumatic pains and aches < cold, damp> MOTION
Neuralgic pains. Suppressed catarrhs.
Warts on hands, fingers, face.
Coryza > MOTION.
Loquacity (extreme).

Tubercular
Hayfever in autumn - 3 miasms
Tubercular -- Ringworm of scalp
Bright's Disease
Respiratory tendencies
Taking cold easily.

Psoric
Various herpetic eruptions
< cold. > Warm, dry weather
Tendency for colds and coughs
Coryza < cold air
Moaning. Groaning Loquacity
Boils
Eczema of infants

Syphilitic
Skin ulcerations
Necrosis, especially tibia
Phagedenic ulcers

"According to Allen and Kent, Dulc. is a deeper tri-miasmatic remedy than was originally thought. It belongs to the same family SOLANUM (NIGRUM - Dulcamara) as Stram. And Hyos.

Kent states first attack looks like Bell.; Bry.; Ferr-p. Treat the underlying constitution, the change which takes place in this patient. Sensitive to cold, damp.

We must observe the time of year hayfever comes on: < Spring or < Autumn."

The book offers a level of detail of miasmatic characteristics that many will have forgotten or, perhaps, not even been exposed to, since the current trend is to focus solely on apparent central trends of the psyche or highly generalized disease themes; eg, deficiency, overproduction or excess, destructiveness.

The most impressive section of the book is that covering the tubercular miasm, the contents of which are basically Creasy's accumulated notes gleaned from her study of the subject. The content is extensive and incredibly thorough and replete with detailed guidelines for the treatment of actual tuberculosis (something few of us in the western world will be faced with, but interesting nonetheless). I wonder how many of us know the distinguishing characteristics of Tuberculinum bovinum versus Bacillinum, or of Tuberculinum residium or Tuberculinum aviare or Tuberculinum Koch?

I had the good fortune quite a while back to review some of this information from Ms. Creasy, courtesy of Catherine Coulter. It helped me on an asthma case once when, after Tuberculinum bovinum proved incomplete to the case, Tuberculinum aviare finished the cure.

The book, minimally indexed at present, would benefit from an expansion of the index. Certainly, a bit less condensed expression in this book would have been appreciated; greater exposition would have added to the readability of the text and enhanced the reader's enjoyment and interest. Yet, it is enough as it is - a comprehensive and highly practical handbook of miasmatic prescribing. It should serve well as a study and reference source. I recommend it!

About the Reviewer: George Guess, MD, DHt, practices homeopathy in Charlottesville, Virginia. His is editor of the American Journal of Homeopathic Medicine and Vice-President of the American Board of Homeotherapeutics.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 20, Winter 2007 Edition, with permission from Homeopathic Links.

Reviewed by Annette Gamblin, UK

This book has been penned by Sheilagh Creasy, lecturer and unwavering classical homoeopath of 48 years experience. The promising title does not immediately reveal its subject matter - a study of Hahnemann's theory of miasms according to 'classical' sources. What materialises is a collage of so-called 'classical' authorities on the much misunderstood subject of miasms, glued together by Sheilagh's own clinical experience and philosophical understanding. Fifteen years after its initial conception, the finished creation emerges as a picture rich in information and philosophy, guiding towards application in practice.

The book is divided into five sections, the first being a short introduction to the philosophy by Sheilagh herself, entitled Miasms, Philosophy and Practice. The remaining four are dedicated to Psora, Syphilis, Sycosis and the Tubercular miasm respectively. Each section contains the main characteristics of each miasm, some cases, materia medica and remedy relationships, interspersed with Sheilagh's discussion of the philosophy, which she supports with many carefully chosen quotes from the classical archives. However, one has to go to the contents page at the beginning to understand this structure, as in the body of text one page simply follows the other. There are some inconsistencies between the sections too, for example Tuberculinum is discussed in great depth, yet the other nosodes belonging to each miasm aren't (apart from Psorinum, which gets a mention in the tubercular section).

The cases are brief and reduced to their characteristic components. Not embellished by mental/emotional distractions, they simply serve as illustrations of philosophyand miasm correspondingly. Sheilagh is one of the few practitioners who work authentically with the concept of relationship-of-remedies. Her graphs are interesting, although she does not state her sources for these. Knowing of her wealth of knowledge and experience in this area,

I am sure there would have been much appreciation of her expanding further on this subject.

But now to a point which I find actually quite controversial. Sheilagh writes: "Through my own investigations and study and through discussions with numerous Jewish scholars, I am of the opinion that Hahnemann may have been a Jew. Homoeopathic principles are elucidated in their entirety in the book Likutei Amarim - Tanya..." This to me is a fantastic claim, especially since she does not elaborate on this any further!

The Tanya, first published in 1797, was written by Rabbi Schneur Zlaman of Liadi, who founded the Chabad-Lubavitch Hassidic movement. This incredibly deep and complex philosophy belonging to a branch of Jewish mysticism, based on the Kabbalah was meant to help the individual to deepen their understanding of spiritual issues and to apply them to daily life. I don't think it is likely that Hahnemann had studied this text (the complete work was published in parts over many years), but to claim that the source of Hahnemann's homeopathic principles are specifically explained by this book and that he may therefore have been a Jew is simply outrageous. Of course our philosophy is mirrored in the Kabbalah, but we could refer to many other traditions, for example the perennial philosophy of the hermetic principles, an idea which has already been suggested by some of our authors, including Peter Gienow [1], Misha Norland [2] and others.

I do find that Sheilagh does not clearly differentiate between Hahnemann's and Kent's philosophy in her introduction generally. In my opinion it is more appropriate to refer to the Kabbalah when discussing Swedenborg and Kent. Hahnemann did not share the same vocabulary in terms of hierarchy, degrees, intelligence, simple substance etc. In my mind this topic should have been left to another book entirely! (I would also like to refer to Robert jutte's biography of Hahnemann, quoting Hahnemann's entry into the register of the Freemasons of Hermannstadt on October 16th, 1777 as "religion: protestant") [3].

In the end, Sheilagh's undeniable experience stands out and there are many gems to value, especially her philosophical comments. The book takes you back to philosophic basics, exemplified by key charac teristics of a number of remedies. Therefore, it should be of interest to both serious student and practitioner of traditional classical homeopathy alike.

References
1 Gienow P. Miasmatische Schriftenreihe Nr 1. Die hermetischen Gesetze als Grundlagen der Homoopathie. Buchendorf: Verlag Peter Irl, 2005
2 Norland M. Signatures, Miasms, Aids. Uffculme, Devon: Yondercott Press, 2003
3 Jiitte R. Samuel Hahnemann. Begriinder der Homoopathie. Miinchen: dtv, 2005

Recensie

This book review is reprinted from The Homeopath with the permission from Autumn 2007, Volume 26:2 of The Society of Homoeopaths.

Reviewed by Elaine Weatherley- Jones

There are nor enough books in the homeopathic literature that deal clearly and accurately with the concept of miasms and the application of this concept in contemporary clinical practice. So works on this complex subject are very welcome and I looked forward to reviewing this recent contribution to the field from such a celebrated and experienced practitioner and teacher.

The book begins with an introduction to the origins of Hahnemann's concept of miasms in terms of both his clinical experience and the philosophical context. The author presents the ideas in a way that is grounded in her personal reflections of decades of clinical practice and study of homeopathic literature. Some of these reflections were rather surprising and I was not persuaded on the basis of the information that was presented that, for example, Hahnemann may have been a Jew (p2) or that the "original changing state in mankind was...of a moral and spiritual disorder" (p3). The whole section had the judgemental tone of an Old Testament text. I wondered what relevance these ideas had to the theory and practice of miasms. Overall I did not feel I learned much about the basic principles of miasms from this chapter and felt rather disappointed and alienated by the style and content.

The subsequent chapters are a series of descriptions of each of the miasms in turn and finally, a surprisingly short conclusion. Four miasms are covered - psoric, syphilitic, sycotic and tubercular. For each miasm, a list of characteristics is given followed by some illustrative cases. I found these rather confusing - a wealth of information was present in each of the lists of characteristics but there was no means of gathering it together into a meaningful whole. It felt like reading the lists of symptoms in Clarke's Dictionary of Materia Medica. I am aware of the problem of resolving long lists of symptoms into a meaningful understanding of a remedy or a miasm. I feel that there is a need for more analysis and interpretation of symptoms that can be understood by those of us who wish to deepen our understanding of the theory of miasms and its application.

I feel that there is probably vast knowledge in this book, but it is not laid out in a way that is accessible to students and practitioners, like me, with only a relatively superficial knowledge of the miasms. It quite possibly is a valuable reference tool for those with a great deal of clinical practice with the miasms. The knowledge, skills and experience of the author are hidden in the depths of this book, but have not been brought out in' production. That the author has been immersed in the theory and practice of miasms and has a deep understanding of homeopathy is clear. I feel this could have been a completely different book if there had been some sober and sound editorial advice which seems to have been lacking so that the information is presented in an indigestible form. It is as if we are in the kitchen of a Michelin star chef with exquisite ingredients laid out, yet the sublime meal fails to appear because the kitchen assistant is unsuccessful to ensure we have a working oven or hob.

This book review is reprinted from Homeopathy, Volume 97, Number 4, October 2008, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

Reviewed by David Owen, Winchester, UK

This book starts with Sheilagh Creasy presenting her 'beliefs in Hahnemann's concepts of miasms'. Using her many years of clinical experience and of teaching homeopathy she present her experience of using miasmatic approaches in the treatment of chronic disease. Using a series of case reports, in depth studies of miasms (Psora, Syphilis, Sycosis and Tubercular) and their associated remedies. She starts from the premise that miasms (these 4) have been 'maligned and ignored' and her book does a good job of explaining the thrust of the 4 miasms covered and the associated remedies.

Behind this miasmatic and materia medica information there are many useful pointers in the clinical management of chronic disease, although some of them, such as the idea of latent and active miasms could benefit from further explanation. This book would be a useful companion for the more serious student of homeopathy or for any practitioner revisiting the way they work miasmatically, particularly for those who want to broaden the remedies that they think of in associated with different miasms. In practice I suspect this will be a book for those who have experienced Sheilagh Creasy's teaching and want to have a book to refresh them of some of the concepts and teaching she has covered.

Although I enjoyed some of her more personal diversions into different ideas and concepts, it is sometimes difficult to separate out hypotheses from information that is verified. It is perhaps unfortunate that her first chapter, while accurately talking about Hahnemann's Swedenborgian influences, presents her opinion that Hahnemann may have been a Jew as if it were well established.

On the positive side however, there are numerous insights into materia medica that her clinical experience brings, such as the comparison of different calcium and potassium salts, the idea that remedies that fit on one level reveal deeper acting (and often miasmatic) remedies as deeper aspects of the case. The book is a reminder of her wide range of clinical experience including, for example a discussion on the treatment of an AIDS patient who had also suffered Syphilis and the treatment of the early stages of Tuberculosis. This is a reminder to all those who have worked in homeopathy for a long time that they have valuable insights for our profession and we are indebted to all those that take the time to record them.

The book, like many things worthwhile, is not immediately accessible or easy to dip into, but students and practitioners who are prepared to look below the surface and who are not put off by a lack of structure will get a lot from it.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 101, Number 1 Spring 2008 edition, with permission from American Journal of Homeopathic Medicine.

Reviewed by George Guess, MD, DHt

This reviewer is grateful for the many books that have been published recently about miasms, especially since my earlier homeopathic education was deficient in that area. I can now increasingly see the utility of analyzing cases miasmatically and establishing a blueprint for initial and subsequent treatment.

Ms. Creasy's contribution to this body of literature is equally appreciated. Terse is the first adjective that comes to mind as I think of this book; the bulk of the information is provided in somewhat of an outlined form, with few complete sentences. This economy of words contains a wealth of in formation, however, as it details very succinctly the symptomatic characteristics of the psoric, sycotic, syphilitic and tubercular miasms. After each introduction to a miasm, materia medica highlights of many of the principle remedies in each miasm are provided, complete with a miasmatic analysis (called a "miasmatic reading" - example below) of the remedy (i.e., which symptoms of the remedy correspond to which miasm). Illustrative cases follow, demonstrating miasmatic treatment. Remedy relationships are also emphasized.

Here is an example of a Miasmatic Reading of Dulcamara:

Dulcamara Miasmatic Reading
Psoric; Sycotic; Syphilitic; Tubercular _

Sycotic
Rages
Catarrhal discharges. Snuffles. < Cold, damp.
< cold, damp conditions = diarrhea.
Rheumatic pains and aches < cold, damp> MOTION
Neuralgic pains. Suppressed catarrhs.
Warts on hands, fingers, face.
Coryza > MOTION.
Loquacity (extreme).

Tubercular
Hayfever in autumn - 3 miasms
Tubercular -- Ringworm of scalp
Bright's Disease
Respiratory tendencies
Taking cold easily.

Psoric
Various herpetic eruptions
< cold. > Warm, dry weather
Tendency for colds and coughs
Coryza < cold air
Moaning. Groaning Loquacity
Boils
Eczema of infants

Syphilitic
Skin ulcerations
Necrosis, especially tibia
Phagedenic ulcers

"According to Allen and Kent, Dulc. is a deeper tri-miasmatic remedy than was originally thought. It belongs to the same family SOLANUM (NIGRUM - Dulcamara) as Stram. And Hyos.

Kent states first attack looks like Bell.; Bry.; Ferr-p. Treat the underlying constitution, the change which takes place in this patient. Sensitive to cold, damp.

We must observe the time of year hayfever comes on: < Spring or < Autumn."

The book offers a level of detail of miasmatic characteristics that many will have forgotten or, perhaps, not even been exposed to, since the current trend is to focus solely on apparent central trends of the psyche or highly generalized disease themes; eg, deficiency, overproduction or excess, destructiveness.

The most impressive section of the book is that covering the tubercular miasm, the contents of which are basically Creasy's accumulated notes gleaned from her study of the subject. The content is extensive and incredibly thorough and replete with detailed guidelines for the treatment of actual tuberculosis (something few of us in the western world will be faced with, but interesting nonetheless). I wonder how many of us know the distinguishing characteristics of Tuberculinum bovinum versus Bacillinum, or of Tuberculinum residium or Tuberculinum aviare or Tuberculinum Koch?

I had the good fortune quite a while back to review some of this information from Ms. Creasy, courtesy of Catherine Coulter. It helped me on an asthma case once when, after Tuberculinum bovinum proved incomplete to the case, Tuberculinum aviare finished the cure.

The book, minimally indexed at present, would benefit from an expansion of the index. Certainly, a bit less condensed expression in this book would have been appreciated; greater exposition would have added to the readability of the text and enhanced the reader's enjoyment and interest. Yet, it is enough as it is - a comprehensive and highly practical handbook of miasmatic prescribing. It should serve well as a study and reference source. I recommend it!

About the Reviewer: George Guess, MD, DHt, practices homeopathy in Charlottesville, Virginia. His is editor of the American Journal of Homeopathic Medicine and Vice-President of the American Board of Homeotherapeutics.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 20, Winter 2007 Edition, with permission from Homeopathic Links.

Reviewed by Annette Gamblin, UK

This book has been penned by Sheilagh Creasy, lecturer and unwavering classical homoeopath of 48 years experience. The promising title does not immediately reveal its subject matter - a study of Hahnemann's theory of miasms according to 'classical' sources. What materialises is a collage of so-called 'classical' authorities on the much misunderstood subject of miasms, glued together by Sheilagh's own clinical experience and philosophical understanding. Fifteen years after its initial conception, the finished creation emerges as a picture rich in information and philosophy, guiding towards application in practice.

The book is divided into five sections, the first being a short introduction to the philosophy by Sheilagh herself, entitled Miasms, Philosophy and Practice. The remaining four are dedicated to Psora, Syphilis, Sycosis and the Tubercular miasm respectively. Each section contains the main characteristics of each miasm, some cases, materia medica and remedy relationships, interspersed with Sheilagh's discussion of the philosophy, which she supports with many carefully chosen quotes from the classical archives. However, one has to go to the contents page at the beginning to understand this structure, as in the body of text one page simply follows the other. There are some inconsistencies between the sections too, for example Tuberculinum is discussed in great depth, yet the other nosodes belonging to each miasm aren't (apart from Psorinum, which gets a mention in the tubercular section).

The cases are brief and reduced to their characteristic components. Not embellished by mental/emotional distractions, they simply serve as illustrations of philosophyand miasm correspondingly. Sheilagh is one of the few practitioners who work authentically with the concept of relationship-of-remedies. Her graphs are interesting, although she does not state her sources for these. Knowing of her wealth of knowledge and experience in this area,

I am sure there would have been much appreciation of her expanding further on this subject.

But now to a point which I find actually quite controversial. Sheilagh writes: "Through my own investigations and study and through discussions with numerous Jewish scholars, I am of the opinion that Hahnemann may have been a Jew. Homoeopathic principles are elucidated in their entirety in the book Likutei Amarim - Tanya..." This to me is a fantastic claim, especially since she does not elaborate on this any further!

The Tanya, first published in 1797, was written by Rabbi Schneur Zlaman of Liadi, who founded the Chabad-Lubavitch Hassidic movement. This incredibly deep and complex philosophy belonging to a branch of Jewish mysticism, based on the Kabbalah was meant to help the individual to deepen their understanding of spiritual issues and to apply them to daily life. I don't think it is likely that Hahnemann had studied this text (the complete work was published in parts over many years), but to claim that the source of Hahnemann's homeopathic principles are specifically explained by this book and that he may therefore have been a Jew is simply outrageous. Of course our philosophy is mirrored in the Kabbalah, but we could refer to many other traditions, for example the perennial philosophy of the hermetic principles, an idea which has already been suggested by some of our authors, including Peter Gienow [1], Misha Norland [2] and others.

I do find that Sheilagh does not clearly differentiate between Hahnemann's and Kent's philosophy in her introduction generally. In my opinion it is more appropriate to refer to the Kabbalah when discussing Swedenborg and Kent. Hahnemann did not share the same vocabulary in terms of hierarchy, degrees, intelligence, simple substance etc. In my mind this topic should have been left to another book entirely! (I would also like to refer to Robert jutte's biography of Hahnemann, quoting Hahnemann's entry into the register of the Freemasons of Hermannstadt on October 16th, 1777 as "religion: protestant") [3].

In the end, Sheilagh's undeniable experience stands out and there are many gems to value, especially her philosophical comments. The book takes you back to philosophic basics, exemplified by key charac teristics of a number of remedies. Therefore, it should be of interest to both serious student and practitioner of traditional classical homeopathy alike.

References
1 Gienow P. Miasmatische Schriftenreihe Nr 1. Die hermetischen Gesetze als Grundlagen der Homoopathie. Buchendorf: Verlag Peter Irl, 2005
2 Norland M. Signatures, Miasms, Aids. Uffculme, Devon: Yondercott Press, 2003
3 Jiitte R. Samuel Hahnemann. Begriinder der Homoopathie. Miinchen: dtv, 2005