A guide to methodologies of homeopathy

Taal
English
Type
Paperback
Uitgever
Cutting Edge Publications
Author(s) Ian Watson
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A concise and practical guide to the range of different ways of prescribing using homeopathy. Suitable for homeopathic students and practitioners at all levels, this revised edition has been updated with the addition of several new chapters. The material is illustrated with case histories throughout and contains many suggestions and ideas not found in any other homeopathic book.
Meer informatie
ISBN9780951765760
AuteurIan Watson
TypePaperback
TaalEnglish
Publicatiedatum2004-10-07
Pagina's129
UitgeverCutting Edge Publications
Recensie

This book review is reprinted from The Homoeopath with permission from Nick Churchill of The Society of Homoeopaths.

Reviewed by Mike Strange

The title says exactly what the book is about - basically the "art" part of homoeopathic prescribing. It assumes that the science and the philosophy of homoeopathy are secure in the practitioner's mind, and that the first part of the art, the taking of the case comprehensively and effectively, has been achieved. At that stage we all, whether consciously or not, have to make the choice of how to tackle the information we have obtained and come up with an effective strategy for the treatment of that particular person. This book sets out concisely and clearly the various strategies that are used by homoeopaths to analyse a case and prescribe on the results. A definition of each approach is given, with some of the history, and then the prescribing techniques are described, with some suggestions as to when they might be appropriate. Good examples of cases treated are given in each section, and some of the possible drawbacks of the methods are discussed. Each chapter has suggestions for further reading, and there is a comprehensive reference section at the end of the book.

The author is a Registered Homoeopath working in the north of England, who also teaches homoeopathy. Most of the case examples are from his own practice which gives them an extra quality.

This book will be of immense value to students of homoeopathy of all levels of experience. For the newcomer it will be a useful textbook from which to learn, and for the more established practitioner it will at the very least jog memories and bring to mind useful methods which we may have been overlooking. It has been a pleasure to me to read a book on homoeopathy that is so clearly written, so comprehensive in its cover of the intended field, and so free of doctrinaire restrictions on what we, as homoeopaths, are allowed to consider as valid approaches to a person's illness. The complexity of people and their illnesses surely requires us to consider whatever methods seem most likely to restore them to the freedom of life and health for which they come to us. Not least of the advantages of this book is the fluent style of writing, with a certain charm which makes it easy to read and appreciate.

In short, I intend to keep this book to hand and to use it for inspiration when I get stuck with cases. I am happy to commend it to other homoeopaths, students and practitioners alike.

The Homoeopath Vol.11 No.4 1991

This book review is reprinted from the British Homoeopathic Journal Vol 83, No 1, January 1994, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

This book reviews in a series of short essays a number of different methodologies practised by homoeopaths.

The format of the book, with different aspects of homoeopathic prescribing presented alphabetically and in isolation in separate chapters, makes it easy to dip into but prevents coherent comparison and contrast of the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods. The question which really needs to be addressed is how the different techniques illustrated can, by individualized weighting and prioritization, lead to a personalized prescription. The chapters portray an interesting, if personalized, viewpoint on a variety of methods such as polypharmacy, tautopathy and isopathy, although the philosophical and practical arguments are not presented in sufficient detail to allow readers to form their own opinions. Perhaps the illustration of a signpost on the front of the book is appropriate, as it points in the direction of different methodologies rather than telling us a great deal about the journeys involved in pursuing those directions. The list of further reading at the end of each chapter offers valuable help to the new comer to homoeopathy in pursuing those directions. Some of the chapters are a review of common techniques such as repertorization and isopathic constitutional prescribing, while others, like arborivital medicine, are more obscure.

I am left unsure as to who exactly the book is aimed at. Perhaps the novice homoeopath who has a very restricted methodological approach to patients, or the experienced homoeopath with a very rigid perception of 'the right way to do things'. The book may then provide a taster for the more eclectic approach to homoeopathic prescribing. Unfortunately I think it could appear disjointed and lacking in objectivity for the former, and lacking in depth for the latter.

Newcomers to homoeopathy may find the book helpful if presented within the context of a teaching programme, regular prescribers because it makes you think not so much about what you are doing but about what you are not doing, suggesting some texts for further study. On its own, A Guide to Methodologies of Homoeopathy will not alter the way you practise, but it may make you more tolerant and aware of some of the other ways used by homoeopaths.

D. K. OWEN

British Homoeopathic Journal
Vol 83, Number 1, January 1994

Recensie

This book review is reprinted from The Homoeopath with permission from Nick Churchill of The Society of Homoeopaths.

Reviewed by Mike Strange

The title says exactly what the book is about - basically the "art" part of homoeopathic prescribing. It assumes that the science and the philosophy of homoeopathy are secure in the practitioner's mind, and that the first part of the art, the taking of the case comprehensively and effectively, has been achieved. At that stage we all, whether consciously or not, have to make the choice of how to tackle the information we have obtained and come up with an effective strategy for the treatment of that particular person. This book sets out concisely and clearly the various strategies that are used by homoeopaths to analyse a case and prescribe on the results. A definition of each approach is given, with some of the history, and then the prescribing techniques are described, with some suggestions as to when they might be appropriate. Good examples of cases treated are given in each section, and some of the possible drawbacks of the methods are discussed. Each chapter has suggestions for further reading, and there is a comprehensive reference section at the end of the book.

The author is a Registered Homoeopath working in the north of England, who also teaches homoeopathy. Most of the case examples are from his own practice which gives them an extra quality.

This book will be of immense value to students of homoeopathy of all levels of experience. For the newcomer it will be a useful textbook from which to learn, and for the more established practitioner it will at the very least jog memories and bring to mind useful methods which we may have been overlooking. It has been a pleasure to me to read a book on homoeopathy that is so clearly written, so comprehensive in its cover of the intended field, and so free of doctrinaire restrictions on what we, as homoeopaths, are allowed to consider as valid approaches to a person's illness. The complexity of people and their illnesses surely requires us to consider whatever methods seem most likely to restore them to the freedom of life and health for which they come to us. Not least of the advantages of this book is the fluent style of writing, with a certain charm which makes it easy to read and appreciate.

In short, I intend to keep this book to hand and to use it for inspiration when I get stuck with cases. I am happy to commend it to other homoeopaths, students and practitioners alike.

The Homoeopath Vol.11 No.4 1991

This book review is reprinted from the British Homoeopathic Journal Vol 83, No 1, January 1994, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

This book reviews in a series of short essays a number of different methodologies practised by homoeopaths.

The format of the book, with different aspects of homoeopathic prescribing presented alphabetically and in isolation in separate chapters, makes it easy to dip into but prevents coherent comparison and contrast of the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods. The question which really needs to be addressed is how the different techniques illustrated can, by individualized weighting and prioritization, lead to a personalized prescription. The chapters portray an interesting, if personalized, viewpoint on a variety of methods such as polypharmacy, tautopathy and isopathy, although the philosophical and practical arguments are not presented in sufficient detail to allow readers to form their own opinions. Perhaps the illustration of a signpost on the front of the book is appropriate, as it points in the direction of different methodologies rather than telling us a great deal about the journeys involved in pursuing those directions. The list of further reading at the end of each chapter offers valuable help to the new comer to homoeopathy in pursuing those directions. Some of the chapters are a review of common techniques such as repertorization and isopathic constitutional prescribing, while others, like arborivital medicine, are more obscure.

I am left unsure as to who exactly the book is aimed at. Perhaps the novice homoeopath who has a very restricted methodological approach to patients, or the experienced homoeopath with a very rigid perception of 'the right way to do things'. The book may then provide a taster for the more eclectic approach to homoeopathic prescribing. Unfortunately I think it could appear disjointed and lacking in objectivity for the former, and lacking in depth for the latter.

Newcomers to homoeopathy may find the book helpful if presented within the context of a teaching programme, regular prescribers because it makes you think not so much about what you are doing but about what you are not doing, suggesting some texts for further study. On its own, A Guide to Methodologies of Homoeopathy will not alter the way you practise, but it may make you more tolerant and aware of some of the other ways used by homoeopaths.

D. K. OWEN

British Homoeopathic Journal
Vol 83, Number 1, January 1994