Impossible Cure

Taal
English
Type
Paperback
Uitgever
R.L. Ranch Press
Author(s) Amy L. Lansky
5+ Items Op voorraad
Levertijd 24 uur
€ 17,50
Impossible Cure: The Promise of Homeopathy provides an in-depth and exciting account of the history, philosophy, science, and experience of homeopathic medicine.
At the core of Impossible Cure is the amazing story of how the author's son was cured of autism with homeopathy. It also includes dozens of other testimonials of homeopathic cures for a variety of physical, mental, and emotional conditions.

Impossible Cure will serve as an invaluable guide to anyone interested in learning more about this intriguing form of health care.

Reviewers have described Impossible Cure as one of the most comprehensive and reader-friendly books about homeopathy -- perfect for patient education and as a text for first-year students.

The book includes:

Dozens of first-person testimonials of homeopathic cures for a variety of physical, mental, and emotional conditions. Among these is the amazing story of how the author's son was cured of autism with homeopathy.

A comprehensive introduction to homeopathic philosophy. This includes a discussion of the Law of Similars, remedy provings, suppression, susceptibility, the law of cure, totality of symptoms, individualization of treatment, the center of the case, and prioritization of symptoms.

A step-by-step guide for patients, including: how to find a homeopath; preparing for appointments and follow-ups; what to expect during a homeopathic interview; dosing; antidoting; and interactions with allopathic treatment. The issue of vaccination is also addressed -- especially its relationship to autism and other chronic diseases.

A thorough account of the history and development of homeopathy. This includes: the life of Samuel Hahnemann and his development of various potencies and dosing methods; the history of homeopathy in America; a description of techniques related to classical homeopathy; and the current legal status of homeopathic practice in America.


An extensive chapter on scientific trials of homeopathy, as well as a discussion of possible explanations for the action of remedies within the relams of complexity and chaos theory and biophysics. The book also includes a unique description of homeopathic models of remedy action.
Meer informatie
ISBN9780972751407
AuteurAmy L. Lansky
TypePaperback
TaalEnglish
Publicatiedatum2003-04-02
Pagina's303
UitgeverR.L. Ranch Press
Recensie

This book review is reprinted from Volume 10, 2004 Edition of The American Homeopath with permission from The American Homeopath.

Reviewed by Begabati Lennihan, RN, CCH

What book do you recommend when a patient or friend asks for the best introductory book on homeopathy? For years I have had a stable of favorites, topped by the practical "how-to" books authored or co-authored by Dana Ullman. For those who first want to know "what" and "why," I have suggested Timothy Dooley's Beyond Flat Earth Medicine, a brief and friendly welcome to homeopathic principles and the experience of being a patient. For those wanting to convince a skeptical scientist partner, Bill Gray's Homeopathy: Science or Myth? clearly and convincingly summarizes the research. And for the psychologically inclined, apt to be fascinated by the concept of remedies as personality types, Catherine Coulter's Nature and Human Personality (excerpted from her Portraits of Homeopathic Medicines) provides the perfect enticement.

Not feeling the need for yet another introductory book on homeopathy, I ignored Impossible Cure when Dana Ullman first showed it to me "hot off the presses" a year ago. But when I finally cracked the elegantly designed cover, I realized I had found a new favorite. Amy Lansky's book quickly became the one book I want all my patients to read. (Roger Morrison said the same about Richard Moskowitz' Resonance in his Homeopathy Today review. I find Resonance incomparably eloquent yet much of the material more suited to first or even second year students.)

Lansky, a Stanford Ph.D. and former NASA computer scientist, became a devotee of homeopathy when her son Max was "miraculously" cured of autism. She left the world of conventional science to study, then practice and write about homeopathy. The book carries the weight of authority - with its 300-page heft, its crisp typography, Lansky's highly readable style, and her obvious familiarity with conventional science. Lansky manages to be clear and convincing without ever sinking to polemic. She addresses the most potentially contentious subjects - the dangers of vaccinations and allopathic suppression, the high death rate from allopathic treatment, plus nosodes and miasms - in a matter-of-fact style that is always eloquent, never strident.

Lansky's clarity of style enables her to cover a tremendous range of subjects, giving each only a few sentences or a few pages, yet leaving the reader feeling satisfied with her explanation. It ranges from Hahnemann's life and the development of homeopathic principles, through the popularity of homeopathy in the US and multiple reasons for its subsequent eclipse, through the current situation, even including information on the health freedom laws. While primarily propounding classical homeopathy, including the LM potencies that cured her son, it also covers the Doctrine of Signatures (balanced with a note on the importance of provings), compound remedies, Bach flower remedies, and the use of pendulums and diagnostic machines. One chapter reviews the research on homeopathy and different possible mechanisms of action. The next covers everything a professional homeopath might want a prospective patient to know about how the process works, including an injunction to stay with the process and be willing to be deeply self-revealing. A final chapter covers the current legal and licensure situation for homeopathy, including an argument in favor of health freedom acts; Lansky was part of the successful drive to pass such an act in California.

She weaves the personal with the scientific and historical, providing a balance of information and interest. Just when my eyes began to glaze over, in the chapter on research, she roused my flagging interest with a chapter of "miracle cure" stories, with a scientist's explanation of how the cures could not be attributed to the placebo effect. And she has made her information highly accessible: not only is the book well-indexed, its table of contents includes a string of subheads to each chapter heading, making it easy to find discussions of a particular theme.

The only element that left me cringing was her mention of her son Max's curative remedy, Carcinosin. Mentioning any remedy name in this situation could tempt other readers to dose their autistic children with the same remedy. This is especially a concern with a nosode, given how easily consumers can order remedies on the internet. And the one thing the book does not even attempt to cover is "how to."

But there are plenty of good "how-to" books: Dana Ullman's ubiquitous guides, the Reichenberg-Ullman's simple and user-friendly Homeopathic Self-Care, Asa Hershoff's concise and thorough Homeopathic Remedies. I believe that readers of The Impossible Cure would want to immediately pick up one of these books and start experimenting. I imagine that years from now, we will find a generation of homeopathy students and practitioners saying that Amy Lansky's book started them on their path.

Begabati Lennihan is a classical homeopath practicing in Cambridge, MA and Director of Teleosis School of Homeopathy.

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the National Center for Homeopathy

Reviewed by Lia Bello. RN, FNP, CCH

This new book is one of the clearest and most comprehensive introductions to homeopathy in recent times. In Impossible Cure, Amy Lansky, PhD, explains in a remarkably reader-friendly way the science and art of homeopathy. By including dozens of patients' stories as well as interviews with practitioners, she weaves a well-crafted overview. Her language is not complex, making it accessible to the non-technical reader. This book may very well contribute to the transformation of homeopathy from the ugly duckling of medicine to the swan that it deserves to be.

The book is written from two vantage points: that of a loving mother sharing the heart-wrenching story of her son's struggle with autism and how homeopathy cured him-and that of a skeptic delving into the mysteries of healing. Amy Lansky was a computer scientist working for NASA when the journey of her son’s healing with homeopathy began. In her words, "It did not take long for me to realize that my son’s miraculous cure from autism was far more revolutionary than any computer program or technological gadgetry." She also soon decided that she had to write a book to let others know about homeopathy.

Lansky shares the story of how her son, Max, recovered fully from moderate autism. The fact that her son’s homeopath found the simillimum on the first try makes it all the more amazing and gives hope to us all. At first I thought that the title, Impossible Cure, was too dramatic for an introductory book on homeopathy, but after reading about Max and the other vignettes of healing, I have decided that it is appropriate.

The story of Max’s cure is followed by chapters that delve into deep issues, such as, "What is Disease? What is Cure?" Lansky acquaints the reader with the relationship between the symptom pattern and the simillimum. In order to do this, she presents a historical picture of the development of the varied strategies homeopaths may use when they choose a remedy and its potency. LM potency use is included, so the book joins just a handful of others modern enough to speak of this relatively new phenomenon.

Lansky gives a short explanation of related applications of homeopathy outside the classical homeopathic paradigm, including combination remedies, isopathy, anthroposophic medicines, homeopathic prophylaxis, homeopathic "specifics," cell salts, intuitive and machine-generated prescribing, Flower Essences, herbalism, and energy healing. Lansky states here that it is "important for patients to understand which treatment methods are actually 'homeopathy' and which are not."

Impossible Cure also includes up-to-date information on homeopathic research and its significance in relation to modern medicine. The author's skill at word crafting is noticeable here-whereas other books' descriptions of chaos theory, ultra dilutions, and cluster physics had lost me, this book has actually made these complex theories understandable to my brain - no small feat!

Lansky guides fledgling consumers through finding a practitioner, experiencing an initial interview, taking a remedy, and responding to it This is a great help to someone who has no idea what to expect when stepping into homeopathy. The chapter, "Cure is Possible," relates many success stories drawn from an impressive, international list of practitioners, patients, and their family members - including dramatic reversals of Alzheimer's disease, cancer, fibromyalgia, and mental illness. These are instructive cases illustrating the efficacy of homeopathy.

Impossible Cure sticks to principles and philosophy, completely foregoing any discussion of materia medica and how-to information. It reminds me of George Vithoulkas' little book, Homeopathy: Medicine of the New Man, which I used to recommend to new patients back in the '80s. Since then there have been many good books that have tried to tell the whole story of homeopathy, like Ullman's Discovering Homeopathy, Koehler's Handbook of Homeopathy, and Ullman and Reichenberg-Ullman's The Patient's Guide to Homeopathic Medicine. But it is refreshing and somehow even more legitimate to hear it from Lansky, a cured consumer. My only criticism of her book is that it is lacking perspective on how difficult it can be and how long it takes to become an accurate and effective classical homeopathic prescriber. Though we proponents of homeopathy tend to remain optimistic about the potential for cure, the many complicated cases that go uncured with homeopathic treatment should also be factored into the equation.

Modern issues surrounding the tenuous position of homeopathic practice in the U.S. are discussed in the chapter, "The Road Ahead." Issues of licensure, certification, legal practice, access to remedies, homeopathic training, and health freedom legislation are covered. Few other books address these timely issues.

Since most people, even in enlightened circles, still do not understand homeopathy and its potential, the homeopathic community is faced with the challenge of getting the word out - and the even larger challenge of providing accessible, affordable, professional, homeopathic health care - thereby liberating society from the monopoly of conventional medical care. Homeopathy must grow into a viable healthcare choice for the many - not just for an elite few - and this will take massive education at the grassroots and a shift in how homeopathy is now accessed.

Impossible Cure succeeds in demystifying homeopathy's approach to healing and will help people understand what embarking on homeopathic treatment is all about. The facts and history are accurate and well-documented. Everyone interested in homeopathy can enjoy this book, from the rank beginner to the seasoned homeopath. The book speaks of the promise that homeopathy holds for those who step forward to use it and for practitioners who work with it daily to cure their patients.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 16, Winter 2003 edition of Homeopathic Links with permission from Homeopathic Links.

Reviewed by Joseph Rozencwajg, New Zealand

I have known Amy for many years through the email lists. Although we never discussed anything personally, I was always amazed by the courage and the determination of this lady to cure her son. And so she did. And here is how she did it.

Amy walks us through her and her son Max' story of discovering his autism, and how with the help of her homeopath he is today a normal child. During that story, she also guides us through the history, the basic principles and the applications of homeopathy. Not the usual chronology and explanations we find in all the other books but as they naturally present themselves as an explanation needed during her journey. Chapter 4: 'What is disease? What is cure?' explains in simple terms the need and the usefulness of symptoms and signs.

Chapter 7: 'Science and scepticism' takes care of the modern research in the field of homeopathy in a way that is understandable by anyone. I really appreciated her references and citations. Whereas in many books big famous names are cited, apart from Hahnemann and Whitmont, Amy has used the experience and stories of colleagues and friends, people we talk to every day, who are our neighbours and our practitioners, people you find in the phone book and who are here for their patients on a daily basis: what a refreshing approach!

I found myself reading that book like a thriller, you know the kind of book you already know who is going to win and what is going to happen, but still you cannot avoid to be engulfed in the story and driven to continue. Granted, no professional homeopath is going to learn anything from the book except how to convey information to patients in a way that is correct, informative and fun. As somebody suggested, each of us should buy three copies: one for us, one to lend to potential patients (hoping it will be returned) and one to offer to the municipal library for reference. There are only a few minor flaws I would like to see corrected: one is when explaining the dilutions, Amy writes about I drop in 100 drops or 1 drop in 10 drops, whereas it should be 1 in 99 or 1 in 9…….Let's remain totally correct, no need to oversimplify.

And as this book is going to be an international best-seller, it would be my suggestion to expand the last chapter that deals with the legal situation and how to find a homeopath to other countries than the USA, even though the websites for that purpose are cited: not everybody has access to the net. This is a book of hope for the public, this is a book of information and of testimony that is going to do more for homeopathy than any political bickering has been able to do until now: a mother talking to other mothers and telling them to go for homeopathy.

What else do we need? Thank you, Amy!

Recensie

This book review is reprinted from Volume 10, 2004 Edition of The American Homeopath with permission from The American Homeopath.

Reviewed by Begabati Lennihan, RN, CCH

What book do you recommend when a patient or friend asks for the best introductory book on homeopathy? For years I have had a stable of favorites, topped by the practical "how-to" books authored or co-authored by Dana Ullman. For those who first want to know "what" and "why," I have suggested Timothy Dooley's Beyond Flat Earth Medicine, a brief and friendly welcome to homeopathic principles and the experience of being a patient. For those wanting to convince a skeptical scientist partner, Bill Gray's Homeopathy: Science or Myth? clearly and convincingly summarizes the research. And for the psychologically inclined, apt to be fascinated by the concept of remedies as personality types, Catherine Coulter's Nature and Human Personality (excerpted from her Portraits of Homeopathic Medicines) provides the perfect enticement.

Not feeling the need for yet another introductory book on homeopathy, I ignored Impossible Cure when Dana Ullman first showed it to me "hot off the presses" a year ago. But when I finally cracked the elegantly designed cover, I realized I had found a new favorite. Amy Lansky's book quickly became the one book I want all my patients to read. (Roger Morrison said the same about Richard Moskowitz' Resonance in his Homeopathy Today review. I find Resonance incomparably eloquent yet much of the material more suited to first or even second year students.)

Lansky, a Stanford Ph.D. and former NASA computer scientist, became a devotee of homeopathy when her son Max was "miraculously" cured of autism. She left the world of conventional science to study, then practice and write about homeopathy. The book carries the weight of authority - with its 300-page heft, its crisp typography, Lansky's highly readable style, and her obvious familiarity with conventional science. Lansky manages to be clear and convincing without ever sinking to polemic. She addresses the most potentially contentious subjects - the dangers of vaccinations and allopathic suppression, the high death rate from allopathic treatment, plus nosodes and miasms - in a matter-of-fact style that is always eloquent, never strident.

Lansky's clarity of style enables her to cover a tremendous range of subjects, giving each only a few sentences or a few pages, yet leaving the reader feeling satisfied with her explanation. It ranges from Hahnemann's life and the development of homeopathic principles, through the popularity of homeopathy in the US and multiple reasons for its subsequent eclipse, through the current situation, even including information on the health freedom laws. While primarily propounding classical homeopathy, including the LM potencies that cured her son, it also covers the Doctrine of Signatures (balanced with a note on the importance of provings), compound remedies, Bach flower remedies, and the use of pendulums and diagnostic machines. One chapter reviews the research on homeopathy and different possible mechanisms of action. The next covers everything a professional homeopath might want a prospective patient to know about how the process works, including an injunction to stay with the process and be willing to be deeply self-revealing. A final chapter covers the current legal and licensure situation for homeopathy, including an argument in favor of health freedom acts; Lansky was part of the successful drive to pass such an act in California.

She weaves the personal with the scientific and historical, providing a balance of information and interest. Just when my eyes began to glaze over, in the chapter on research, she roused my flagging interest with a chapter of "miracle cure" stories, with a scientist's explanation of how the cures could not be attributed to the placebo effect. And she has made her information highly accessible: not only is the book well-indexed, its table of contents includes a string of subheads to each chapter heading, making it easy to find discussions of a particular theme.

The only element that left me cringing was her mention of her son Max's curative remedy, Carcinosin. Mentioning any remedy name in this situation could tempt other readers to dose their autistic children with the same remedy. This is especially a concern with a nosode, given how easily consumers can order remedies on the internet. And the one thing the book does not even attempt to cover is "how to."

But there are plenty of good "how-to" books: Dana Ullman's ubiquitous guides, the Reichenberg-Ullman's simple and user-friendly Homeopathic Self-Care, Asa Hershoff's concise and thorough Homeopathic Remedies. I believe that readers of The Impossible Cure would want to immediately pick up one of these books and start experimenting. I imagine that years from now, we will find a generation of homeopathy students and practitioners saying that Amy Lansky's book started them on their path.

Begabati Lennihan is a classical homeopath practicing in Cambridge, MA and Director of Teleosis School of Homeopathy.

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the National Center for Homeopathy

Reviewed by Lia Bello. RN, FNP, CCH

This new book is one of the clearest and most comprehensive introductions to homeopathy in recent times. In Impossible Cure, Amy Lansky, PhD, explains in a remarkably reader-friendly way the science and art of homeopathy. By including dozens of patients' stories as well as interviews with practitioners, she weaves a well-crafted overview. Her language is not complex, making it accessible to the non-technical reader. This book may very well contribute to the transformation of homeopathy from the ugly duckling of medicine to the swan that it deserves to be.

The book is written from two vantage points: that of a loving mother sharing the heart-wrenching story of her son's struggle with autism and how homeopathy cured him-and that of a skeptic delving into the mysteries of healing. Amy Lansky was a computer scientist working for NASA when the journey of her son’s healing with homeopathy began. In her words, "It did not take long for me to realize that my son’s miraculous cure from autism was far more revolutionary than any computer program or technological gadgetry." She also soon decided that she had to write a book to let others know about homeopathy.

Lansky shares the story of how her son, Max, recovered fully from moderate autism. The fact that her son’s homeopath found the simillimum on the first try makes it all the more amazing and gives hope to us all. At first I thought that the title, Impossible Cure, was too dramatic for an introductory book on homeopathy, but after reading about Max and the other vignettes of healing, I have decided that it is appropriate.

The story of Max’s cure is followed by chapters that delve into deep issues, such as, "What is Disease? What is Cure?" Lansky acquaints the reader with the relationship between the symptom pattern and the simillimum. In order to do this, she presents a historical picture of the development of the varied strategies homeopaths may use when they choose a remedy and its potency. LM potency use is included, so the book joins just a handful of others modern enough to speak of this relatively new phenomenon.

Lansky gives a short explanation of related applications of homeopathy outside the classical homeopathic paradigm, including combination remedies, isopathy, anthroposophic medicines, homeopathic prophylaxis, homeopathic "specifics," cell salts, intuitive and machine-generated prescribing, Flower Essences, herbalism, and energy healing. Lansky states here that it is "important for patients to understand which treatment methods are actually 'homeopathy' and which are not."

Impossible Cure also includes up-to-date information on homeopathic research and its significance in relation to modern medicine. The author's skill at word crafting is noticeable here-whereas other books' descriptions of chaos theory, ultra dilutions, and cluster physics had lost me, this book has actually made these complex theories understandable to my brain - no small feat!

Lansky guides fledgling consumers through finding a practitioner, experiencing an initial interview, taking a remedy, and responding to it This is a great help to someone who has no idea what to expect when stepping into homeopathy. The chapter, "Cure is Possible," relates many success stories drawn from an impressive, international list of practitioners, patients, and their family members - including dramatic reversals of Alzheimer's disease, cancer, fibromyalgia, and mental illness. These are instructive cases illustrating the efficacy of homeopathy.

Impossible Cure sticks to principles and philosophy, completely foregoing any discussion of materia medica and how-to information. It reminds me of George Vithoulkas' little book, Homeopathy: Medicine of the New Man, which I used to recommend to new patients back in the '80s. Since then there have been many good books that have tried to tell the whole story of homeopathy, like Ullman's Discovering Homeopathy, Koehler's Handbook of Homeopathy, and Ullman and Reichenberg-Ullman's The Patient's Guide to Homeopathic Medicine. But it is refreshing and somehow even more legitimate to hear it from Lansky, a cured consumer. My only criticism of her book is that it is lacking perspective on how difficult it can be and how long it takes to become an accurate and effective classical homeopathic prescriber. Though we proponents of homeopathy tend to remain optimistic about the potential for cure, the many complicated cases that go uncured with homeopathic treatment should also be factored into the equation.

Modern issues surrounding the tenuous position of homeopathic practice in the U.S. are discussed in the chapter, "The Road Ahead." Issues of licensure, certification, legal practice, access to remedies, homeopathic training, and health freedom legislation are covered. Few other books address these timely issues.

Since most people, even in enlightened circles, still do not understand homeopathy and its potential, the homeopathic community is faced with the challenge of getting the word out - and the even larger challenge of providing accessible, affordable, professional, homeopathic health care - thereby liberating society from the monopoly of conventional medical care. Homeopathy must grow into a viable healthcare choice for the many - not just for an elite few - and this will take massive education at the grassroots and a shift in how homeopathy is now accessed.

Impossible Cure succeeds in demystifying homeopathy's approach to healing and will help people understand what embarking on homeopathic treatment is all about. The facts and history are accurate and well-documented. Everyone interested in homeopathy can enjoy this book, from the rank beginner to the seasoned homeopath. The book speaks of the promise that homeopathy holds for those who step forward to use it and for practitioners who work with it daily to cure their patients.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 16, Winter 2003 edition of Homeopathic Links with permission from Homeopathic Links.

Reviewed by Joseph Rozencwajg, New Zealand

I have known Amy for many years through the email lists. Although we never discussed anything personally, I was always amazed by the courage and the determination of this lady to cure her son. And so she did. And here is how she did it.

Amy walks us through her and her son Max' story of discovering his autism, and how with the help of her homeopath he is today a normal child. During that story, she also guides us through the history, the basic principles and the applications of homeopathy. Not the usual chronology and explanations we find in all the other books but as they naturally present themselves as an explanation needed during her journey. Chapter 4: 'What is disease? What is cure?' explains in simple terms the need and the usefulness of symptoms and signs.

Chapter 7: 'Science and scepticism' takes care of the modern research in the field of homeopathy in a way that is understandable by anyone. I really appreciated her references and citations. Whereas in many books big famous names are cited, apart from Hahnemann and Whitmont, Amy has used the experience and stories of colleagues and friends, people we talk to every day, who are our neighbours and our practitioners, people you find in the phone book and who are here for their patients on a daily basis: what a refreshing approach!

I found myself reading that book like a thriller, you know the kind of book you already know who is going to win and what is going to happen, but still you cannot avoid to be engulfed in the story and driven to continue. Granted, no professional homeopath is going to learn anything from the book except how to convey information to patients in a way that is correct, informative and fun. As somebody suggested, each of us should buy three copies: one for us, one to lend to potential patients (hoping it will be returned) and one to offer to the municipal library for reference. There are only a few minor flaws I would like to see corrected: one is when explaining the dilutions, Amy writes about I drop in 100 drops or 1 drop in 10 drops, whereas it should be 1 in 99 or 1 in 9…….Let's remain totally correct, no need to oversimplify.

And as this book is going to be an international best-seller, it would be my suggestion to expand the last chapter that deals with the legal situation and how to find a homeopath to other countries than the USA, even though the websites for that purpose are cited: not everybody has access to the net. This is a book of hope for the public, this is a book of information and of testimony that is going to do more for homeopathy than any political bickering has been able to do until now: a mother talking to other mothers and telling them to go for homeopathy.

What else do we need? Thank you, Amy!